Middle-aged women with gum disease have slightly higher risk of developing breast cancer than those without gum problems

Middle-aged women with gum disease have slightly higher risk of developing breast cancer than those without gum problems

A latest study has suggested that middle-aged women with gum disease have a little more chances of developing breast cancer in comparison to the ones without gum problems. Reuters wrote that women with gum disease, who smoked cigarettes or had quit the habit in the last 2 decades, were more likely to have the risk.

But the authors have mentioned that they weren’t still clear and unsure regarding what resulted in between the two factors.

Lead author Jo Freudenheim, distinguished professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health in the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions in New York State, said that they weren’t aware so far about whether it's causal, and shouldn’t forget that.

She told Reuters Health that the characteristics may be related to something else that is behind both breast cancer and gum disease.

Under the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, the researchers analyzed data linked to 73,000 postmenopausal women. At the beginning of the study, these women didn’t have breast cancer.

They found that nearly one quarter of the participating women had periodontal disease. This diseases is a chronic inflammation and infection of gum tissue located at the teeth’s base. Past studies have associated gum disease with heart disease, diabetes, stroke and many other cancers.

Post an average follow up time span of six and a half years, they discovered that 2,100 women study participants had been diagnosed with breast cancer. As per the results in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, the risk of breast cancer was 14% higher for participants suffering from gum disease.

According to a report from the ScienceWorldReport, Researchers at the University of Buffalo found that postmenopausal women with gum disease are more likely to develop breast cancer--particularly if they smoke or have a history of smoking.

"If we can study periodontal disease and breast cancer in other populations, and if we can do more detailed study of the characteristics of the periodontal disease, it would help us understand if there is a relationship," said Dr. Jo Freudenheim, a professor at the University at Buffalo, in a news release. "There is still much to understand about the role, if any, of oral bacteria and breast cancer."

The DesignnTrend notes that, Middle-aged women with gum disease have a slightly higher risk of developing breast cancer compared to those without gum problems, suggests a new study.

"We don't know if it's causal, we need to keep that in mind," said lead author Jo Freudenheim, distinguished professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health in the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions in New York State.

Women who have had false-positive results on mammograms may face a greater risk of future breast cancer, according to a new study led by a UNC-Chapel Hill researcher. The findings were published last week in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, which is a journal of the American Association of Cancer Research. The study analyzed 2.2 million mammograms from 1.3 million U.S. women who ranged in age from 40 to 74, reports AbqJournal.

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