Butterfly Gardeners Customize Their Garden to Suit Dietary Needs of Monarch Butterflies

It is known that population of iconic monarch butterfly has drastically fallen over the period of past few years. The monarch butterfly has an annual migration period and could be seen in seasons of spring, summer, and fall, fly all over. Locals of Crockett County along with several butterfly gardeners are making every possible effort to help the butterflies re-populate.  Population of the monarch butterfly has dropped almost 96% over the past few decades. Butterfly lover and gardeners are customizing their

It is known that population of iconic monarch butterfly has drastically fallen over the period of past few years. The monarch butterfly has an annual migration period and could be seen in seasons of spring, summer, and fall, fly all over. Locals of Crockett County along with several butterfly gardeners are making every possible effort to help the butterflies re-populate.

Crockett County residents Rick Light and wife, Beth Light said they are huge nature lovers. Starting from bird watching, the couple has spent past 12 years in butterfly gardening.

Butterfly gardening is to make every essential element available for the monarch butterflies so that they can re-populate. After learning about a huge decline in the population of the iconic butterfly several butterfly gardeners have also customized their garden for the monarchs.

Some even use tagging method to help aid scientists in tracking the butterfly’s migratory paths. They tag the butterfly using stickers which can help in findings their original location and can also be identified and used in correlation to the butterflies' final ending point.

According to the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), monarch’s population has dropped 96.5% over the past few decades and only 35 million were left in the year 2014. This dramatic decline is leading the FWS to consider placing the monarchs on the list of endangered species.

Monarchs are cold-blooded insects by nature, and depend on the warmth of the sun to encourage their ability to fly. And if they fail to reach their overwinter sites before temperatures drop, most of them die.

Popular Stories

Overall childhood ‘asthma epidemic’ levels off in U.S.

The overall ‘asthma epidemic’ among children has... Read More

‘UC Quits’ Working to Help California Smokers Get Rid Of Smoking

As New Year is approaching, people have already... Read More

Scientists begin Stem Cell research to find cure for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease, the commonest cause of... Read More

New House Bill to Restrict First-Time Opioid Prescriptions

Cases of opioid abuse have been increasing and... Read More

Comcast installs DOCSIS 3.1 modem on customer-facing network in Philadelphia

In an announcement made on December 22, cable giant... Read More